Autism & the money hungry medical community

There’s an ugly side to therapies for Autism and Sensory Processing Disorder.

I’ve learned a few things along the way.

Not all therapists and doctors are wanting to truly help your loved one with a diagnosis.

Unfortunately a lot of therapists and therapy agencies see LARGE money symbols when they hear the words Autism or special needs.

With my child’s first diagnosis I was oblivious. Unaware of the money maker that Autism has become.

But as time went on I realized how much the therapists were overcharging. How many behaviors they wanted to “fix” how many sessions it could take to “fix” these behaviors.

I found myself stopping multiple therapies because of the money hungry therapists charging an ungodly amount for honestly some weird shit.

I personally like that my kids know how to line up shit with such precision that truly takes patience and hard work.

I don’t discourage healthy behaviors. They may hit the nail on the head for autism behaviors but they don’t harm and it doesn’t truly affect their days.

I became so discouraged with the medical community that we up and moved our family away. Finding equine therapy that was truly amazing for our kids.

But then again it was met with a money hungry therapist. Using my kids labels for her own financial betterment.

It became less about helping them and more about how much can I possibly charge you.

She wasn’t the first and she wasn’t the last therapist to take my kids labels and use them for personal financial comfort.

It’s hard to find therapists that truly want to work with your loved one with Autism.

It’s discouraging and it’s downright annoying.

I love what I’ve learned from both my kids. I’ve found out things about myself and my kids that I would never have understood had they not been labeled.

If you find yourself shelling out ungodly amounts of cash flow for therapy I encourage you to really look at what the therapist is working on with your kids. What are they charging you? Do you notice a difference. Is it really bettering your situation. And are your kids happy? And are there things that you can learn yourself and help your kids daily with?

I remember one specific session with my daughter where the therapist treated her with such disrespect and lack of compassion for any person that I immediately felt mama bear take hold. And had some words.

I always have hated the therapists that talk about your child’s struggles in front of them. Almost shaming them for something they cannot control.

Autism is a daily challenge for the kids and for me.

But it is definitely not something less. It isn’t something to be cured. It isn’t something to change.

For now we do not have our kids in therapy. Instead I use everything I’ve learned over the years and encourage them when they are struggling. Hold them during difficult times. And love them no matter what.

Therapy isn’t the end all be all for Autism.

Unfortunately the medical community has made it a massive money making scheme. Scaring parents into days of therapy.

But as a mom of two kids on the spectrum. I’m telling you. Therapy shouldn’t be about money. Therapy should be an aid for your child’s struggles.

If you find yourself unhappy with therapy or notice your child’s behaviors become worse with therapy.

Consider how it feels for them. Consider how financially it’s affecting you and benefiting the therapists.

I’m not saying autism doesn’t benefit from therapy. I’m saying in a world of personal gain therapists may not have the interests of your family in mind. They may be blinded by money symbols.

Benefits of gardening with young children with sensory challenges

Gardening is a great way for children to get the sensory input their bodies crave.

IMG-8673.JPG

You can’t deny all of the input you receive from being outside, digging in the dirt, (barefoot if you are related to me and my children.)

I made sure to really understand and learn from the occupational therapists about the children’s different sensory needs.

Before Miss H and EBEs diagnosis’s I didn’t understand the term; sensory seeker, undersensitive, hypersensitive, avoider, just to name a few.

But I’ve made it a priority to learn, to take notes, to ask when something isn’t working.

Anyways I am a firm believer that we do need to go back to our roots sometimes.  No you don’t need to throw out your WiFi router, or toss your computer.  But, we’ve become a society obsessed with labels, obsessed with quick fixes, overly medicated, instead of making maybe a few life changes.

This is my first big garden.  Most of it was started from seed.  It was back breaking labor, but I love seeing our progress.  I love being able to teach the kids about the importance of diet (because in our home it truly does make a difference with behaviors).

I love knowing how things were raised, no pesticides, truly organic food.

I don’t have enough this year so of course I still buy from the grocery store.

It not only teaches the importance of working hard for what we eat.  Being grateful, and not being wasteful as well.

The kids absolutely love it.

Usually they are barefoot, which I wholeheartedly support.  If you haven’t researched grounding and barefoot walking you should.  It’s pretty interesting.

I have a sensory seeker, and a sensory avoider, one loves to be barefoot and one doesn’t.

EBE is the sensory avoider.  Somehow after we had spent 30 minutes digging for potatoes he barely had dirt on his fingers and asked for it to be immediately washed off.

Miss H and I had dirt in our hair, up to our elbows and were barefoot.

EBE is the avoider, and Miss H is a sensory seeker.

Both were so excited to be picking their own food and were tasting it along the way.

EBE has a lot of food aversions, but even he was so thrilled at our garden finds that he happily ate some freshly pulled carrots.

There is so much value in teaching your kids about healthy diet choices, teaching them to grow their own food.

I know for our house food really affects the behaviors we see.  I can always tell if we’ve been a bit to relaxed on diet and snacks.

Have you noticed a change in your child with autism or sensory processing disorder depending on their diet?

I find that whole foods and non processed foods are the best way to go for us.  I tried gluten free, but it didn’t make a difference for us I didn’t see a noticeable change in behaviors like I do with whole, natural foods, and lots of water.

Thank you for reading!

Danielle